Dead or Alive 2

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I’d even go as far as saying DOA2 teaches some poor fighting game fundamentals, simply because counters in other 3D fighting games will suddenly seem “way too difficult” for players used to DOAmechanics. Counters do look pretty cool however, especially since each character has his or her own unique hard-hitting throw techniques. There are also some cool combo possibilities in DOA2, but when counters can be used at any time and so frequently, the actual gameplay becomes a bit monotonous and overly dependant on countering.

The Japanese Dreamcast version was released on September 28, 2000. The most notable addition was that Bankotsubo and Bayman were now unlockable, playable in all but Story Mode.

An update titled Dead or Alive 2 Millennium was released in January 2000. This made Survival and Tag Battle available from the start and added school uniforms for Kasumi and Ayane. The arcade version was also released in the western regions during an unknown time.

A far cry from a few nice landscapes wrapped around an arena. This is my favorite fighter on the PS2, right up there with KOF XI. I have many fond memories of this game, and as it was my intro to the DOA series, it has a lot a value to me.

The new stages from the PlayStation 2 version were not included, in favor of new versions of Burai Zenin and L’s Castle from the first game. This version also added Sparring mode for Tag Battle, Watch Mode, the User Profile System, online play, more costumes to unlock, and a CG Gallery with character renders. The first version of Dead or Alive 2 was released to Japanese arcades on October 19th, 1999, running on Sega’s NAOMI arcade system. It featured twelve playable characters, Story Mode and Time Attack Mode. It also included Survival Mode and Tag Battle, but these had to be unlocked with a code in the service menu.

It would be the last arcade release for the series until Dead or Alive 5 Ultimate Arcade thirteen years later. Cover art featured Kasumi and Ayane, along with a standard cover art version with Kasumi, Ayane and Leifang. The new stages from the PlayStation 2 version were not included, in favor of new versions of Burai Zenin and L’s Castle stages from the first game. This version also added Sparring mode for Tag Battle, Watch Mode, the User Profile System, online play, more costumes to unlock, and a Gallery Mode with character renders. The Dreamcast port was first released in North America on February 29, 2000. It was based on the NAOMI arcade “Millennium update” version, but added Versus and Sparring modes, as well as Team Battle Mode.

There are 33 costumes spread across all characters in this version. Ultimately, Dead or Alive 2 is a top beat-em-up, but it isn’t going to last. The real shame here is that the reasons for this are so plain and obvious that it’s truly despairing that it didn’t occur to Tecmo to do something about them. In effect what they’ve done is to taken the arcade incarnation of the game and allowed Dreamcast owners unrestricted access to all of it. Although it’s not going to keep you coming back for as long as Soul Calibur did, it’s still one of the most beautiful and playable games on the console. In terms of visuals, there aren’t enough effectual adjectives to satisfy my taste for them.

There are quite a few modes in addition to learning the ins and outs of different characters by taking them to training mode and seeing how they move, what they can combo, and so on. Great experience, and even to this day, it feels more impressive than the offerings we get in the fighting genre on PS4 and Xbox One. So many different fighting styles unlike other fighting games that copy the same move list to characters, in DOA2 no two characters are alike. Dead or Alive 2 features extreme volatility and huge win potential. It’s possible to hit over 100,000 times the bet and players have the opportunity to choose the volatility of the free spin games, giving the choice between the chance of winning really big or winning more often.

Dead or Alive 2 was released on March 30, 2000 as a launch title for the PlayStation 2 in Japan. This version added new stages and new unlockable costumes. The game engine ran using Field Rendering instead of Frame Rendering, thus it appeared much more aliased than the Dreamcast ports. This version was buggy and prone to lock up in Versus mode.

The character models are stunning, especially the women, although more from a technical standpoint than anything else. The curves and contours of all the characters’ bodies, not least the women are very realistic, and the way in which they move is lifelike to the last. One of the things that was given a lot of attention in Soul Calibur was its sumptuously detailed backdrops. At closer inspection however it became apparent that that is all they were, backgrounds. DOA2 ups the ante a little with truly interactive locations, such as a Tibetan Palace with four whole floors of lavishness to be thrown about on.

More about Dead or Alive 2 slot

Name Dead or Alive 2
Provider NetEnt
Release Date 23.04.2019
RTP 96.80%
Variance HIGH
Jackpot 2000000
Reels 5
Paylines 3

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